AOS 2 unit 4 journal: When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victims

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Title  When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victims
Date  14th August 2014
Author  Nick Wing
URL  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/14/media-black-victims_n_5673291.html
Publication  Huffington Post
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  Media in the USA is depicting black victims for the blame.
  • Media are also depicting white perpetrators in an air of disbelief.
  • Media are even showing alleged murderers in a positive light.
Feature of Language  Euphemisms and Dysphemisms.

Use of Elevated word choice to describe white suspects.

Attitudes towards certain group identities.

Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to. Representations of individual and group identities in a range of historical and contemporary texts.

Features of language that contribute to a sense of individual identity and group membership.

Language of Journalist is  shaped by social expectations and community attitudes.

My opinion on the Article’s comments.  America still has a prejudice again African Americans. Racism is still an issue in America and this is seen in the headlines creating in US newspapers. This may be because the audience for these specific newspapers are thought to be white Americans or that the owners of such newspapers are racist themselves and are fine with these judgements. Many may generalise the identity of African Americans as people who are apart of gangs and this may be the reason why journalists have continually brought up how African American victims are associated with drugs, or violence in the past without the exact details to prove it. This may also be used in headlines to protect the perpetrator especially when the guilty are apart of law enforcement.
Quotes  “Ohio shooting suspect, T.J. Lane, described as ‘fine person'” headline of a white male suspect who killed 3 people

“Travyon Martin was suspended 3 times from school” Headline of when Travyon Martin was shot dead.

 

AOS 2 unit 4 journal: Legally Brown: Muslim comedian finds the funny in radical, be it jihadists or bogans

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Title  Legally Brown: Muslim comedian finds the funny in radical, be it jihadists or bogans
Date  24th September 2013
Author  Waleed Aly
URL  http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/box-seat/legally-brown-muslim-comedian-finds-the-funny-in-radical-be-it-jihadists-or-bogans-20130924-2uavt.html
Publication  Sydney Morning Herald
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  Comedian Nazeem Hussain is showing how Australian are being subconsciously racist.
  • He is also pointing fun at the extreme lengths that some take to be politically correct.
  • Showing how many Australian have a pre-determined fear of Muslims.
  • Some people are outrage that Muslims should criticise Australia’s way of life, because by putting it bluntly they are not “real Australians”.
  • How language of specific cultures are stereotyped.
Feature of Language  The use of metaphors and comparisons to show a message.Ethnolects can divide Australian society.

Use of accent to create an identity.

Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.
  • features of language that contribute to a sense of individual identity and group membership
  • National Identity of Australia and that it is changing.
My opinion on the Article’s comments.  Many Australians have been offended by Nazeem Hussain’s “Living Brown” TV show. This for many is because they feel uncomfortable when they find themselves being critiqued or being shown to be a racist by the shows skits. Many may find they have made similar assumptions to what is being highlighted in the show, this can have the viewer feel uneasy and guilty. Though this is the reason for Nazeem creating the show, to highlight to Australians how assumption they have made are wrong so that they can learn from their mistakes.
Quotes  “He’s exposing a binary world where there’s whiteness, and then otherness. Where white people are individuals and non-white people (a singular group) are not.””(Muslims) we were outsiders, and should behave as such. We were not, to borrow from Michael Smith again, “real Australians”. We should know our place. We are welcome, but only as supplicants, celebrating the nation’s unblemished virtue.”

““ethnic” comedy in Australia has hitherto been about the parading of stereotypes for comfortable, mainstream consumption.”

AOS 2 unit 4 journal: Aussie slang is as diverse as Australia itself

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Title  Aussie slang is as diverse as Australia itself
Date  24 June 2014
Author  Rob Pensalfini
URL  http://theconversation.com/aussie-slang-is-as-diverse-as-australia-itself-27973
Publication  The Conversation
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  There are fewer new Australian slang words being created.
  • Most of Australian classic slang phrases originated from Cockney and Irish settlers, e.g. strewth and tucker.
  • As the cultural make up of Australia changes so will the origin of new words and phrases.
  • General Australians are listening to language from America and UK more than ever.
  • Slang is usually created by under-classes or the less standard English speakers.
  • Marginalised group such as Aboriginals and urban youth from Mediterranean backgrounds have been a wealth of linguistic innovation.
Feature of Language Word creation/Neologisms.

 

The use of slang to gain covert prestige.

Borrowing of words from other cultures and languages.

Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.  Globalisation of EnglishNational identity

  • The ways in which people draw on their linguistic repertoire to gain power and prestige, including exploiting overt and covert norms.
  • The relationship between social attitudes and language choices.
  • the use of informal language in
    – maintaining positive face needs
    – promoting linguistic innovation
My opinion on the Article’s comments.  The creation of Australian slang that represents an ocker Australian culture is dying down. This is because there has been a shift away from this culture towards a more general and multicultural society. The globalism of English and the ability to communicate around the world at any moment has led to a sharing of slang language around the world. Therefore many Australians can be using new slang which has come from America as they have seen it in the many American TV shows that are popular in Australia. An informal environment is the best setting for slang language to grow. The most informal in present day Australia is online and that is why most of Australia’s new neologisms have been created online.
Quotes  “It seems some elements of Australian English have been exported to our more populous neighbours. No worries has become prevalent in the USA in the last decade, especially on the West Coast.”New Australian English, or “Wogspeak”. This variety of Australian English was made famous by TV shows like Wogs Out of Work and Pizza. Wogspeak has given us a number of new Australian slang terms, including habib (“mate”, the Arabic for “darling”), stooge (“idiot”, an old word but re-cycled and brought into its own by this vernacular), skip for an Anglo-Celtic Australian (from “Skippy”, the bush kangaroo), and a brand new extension of Cockney-Aussie rhyming slang: chocco (“wog”, rhyming with “chocolate frog”).

“The evocative interjection Strewth, for instance, is a remnant of an early modern fashion that fell out of use in England….but they hung on in Australia, with Strewth (“God’s truth”) outlasting them all.”

 

AOS 2 unit 4 journal: Oxford Dictionaries Adds ‘Hot Mess,’ ‘Side Boob,’ ‘Throw Shade’

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Title  Oxford Dictionaries Adds ‘Hot Mess,’ ‘Side Boob,’ ‘Throw Shade’
Date  13th August 2014
Author  Katy Steinmetz
URL  http://time.com/3109043/oxford-dictionaries-adds-hot-mess-side-boob-throw-shade/
Publication  Time
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  Oxford dictionaries has added many new words to their online database.
  • This is a step taken to standardise new language and to give a resource for those who come across these new words and do not understand them.
  • This words are not being entered in the Oxford English dictionary, for words to be accepted into OED they must have significant historical impact.
Feature of Language  Word formation: compounding, acronyms, initialisms and shortenings.
Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.  Attitudes within society to different varieties of English, including prescriptivism and descriptivism.The role of language in constructing national identity.

social and personal variation in language according to factors such as age, gender, occupation, interests, aspiration and education.

The relationship between social attitudes and language choices.

My opinion on the Article’s comments.  New words are being created and used every year. The use of the internet can allow new words to travel the word and being used internationally instantly. Therefore it is important for bodies such as Oxford dictionaries to record these words in a formal database. This allows those who are unsure of the meaning of these new words to understand them. By recording these neologisms they are becoming standardised. Many of these words will not last and will begin to decrease in popularity but others will become apart of mainstream English just like words such as “chick”  and “flip flops” have done in the past.
Quotes  “binge-watch (v.): watch multiple episodes of a television program in rapid succession.”“bro hug (n.): a friendly embrace between two men.”

tech-savvy (n.): well informed about or proficient in the use of modern technology.

time-poor (adj.): spending much of one’s time working or occupied.

AOS 2 unit 4 journal: Dead Poets Society meets Team Australia under captain Abbott

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Title  Dead Poets Society meets Team Australia under captain Abbott
Date  26th August 2014
Author  David Rowe
URL

 http://theconversation.com/dead-poets-society-meets-team-australia-under-captain-abbott-30852?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+26+August+2014+-+18

74&utm_content=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+26+August+2014+-+1874+CID_fddcd798fd7b2bd3ef77492b194b62bc&utm_source=campaign_monitor&utm_term=Dead%20Po

ets%20Society%20meets%20Team%20Australia%20under%20captain%20Abbott

Publication  The Conversation
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  • Tony Abbot is using sports metaphors to sell his security reforms.
  • Representing the Australian culture as a sporting team.
Feature of Language
  • Metaphors
  • Informal language
  • Language to encourage solidarity
Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.  The use of informal language in
– encouraging intimacy, solidarity and equality
– maintaining positive face needsThe use of formal language in
–  manipulating or obfuscating 
My opinion on the Article’s comments.  Tony Abbot is using language to try and convince Australians to get on board with the governments new national security reforms. He is doing this by using metaphors to try and blur the lines between the Australian government with the Australia’s popular national sporting teams. Australia’s sporting teams are very popular with the public and by using language which is from the sports domain it can manipulate the public into having popular view on the government. While this may appeal to many Australians, others will find this use of language inappropriate and unprofessional. It would not impress those who are keen followers of politics in Australia.
Quotes  “What has made sport so uniquely effective a medium for inculcating national feelings, at all events for males, is the ease with which even the least political or public individuals can identify with the nation as symbolised by young persons excelling at what practically every man wants, or at one time in his life has wanted, to be good at. The imagined community of millions seems more real as a team of 11 named people.” Eric Hobsbawm” The transparent intention of evoking Team Australia is to encourage the kind of collective purpose and identity evident when the Australian cricket or Olympic teams are “doing battle” as if – as is the case with war – their very lives depended on it.”

AOS 2 unit 4 journal: Conversational differences between Men and Women

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Title  Conversational differences between Men and Women
Date
Author  Mark Davies
URL  http://davies-linguistics.byu.edu/elang273/notes/cnvAnlys.htm
Publication  davies-linguistics
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  • Men use language to convey information where as women will more often use language to establish and maintain relationships.
  • Women interpret language in terms of intimacy and relationships.
  • Men discuss issues primarily for solutions where as women discuss issues to be consoled.
  • Men discussion revolve around who is the most dominant, e.g who is the best at.. or who is the most knowledgeable.
  • Men give less supporting cues to the speaker where as women will give supportive cues to the speaker.
  • Men give more direct commands where as women give more indirect command. Women respect negative face needs more.
  • Men use teasing and bantering to show friendship
  • Women will try to avoid conflict and increase their friendship by showing solidarity.
Feature of Language  Negative and Positive face needs.

The use of minimal responses, listening noises.

 

Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.  Social and personal variation in language according to factors such as gender and interests
Features of language that contribute to a sense of individual identity and group membershipThe ways in which people draw on their linguistic repertoire to gain power and prestige, including exploiting overt and covert norms

the use of informal language in
– encouraging intimacy, solidarity and equality
– maintaining positive face needs

My opinion on the Article’s comments.  This articles points out very generalised differences in the language usage of male and females. The point that males will more often be more straight to the point when it comes to conversation and just use language to carry a message is fairly spot on. Men are more comfortable being in silence then women and therefore their language is more concise. I disagree on the point that Men interpret language in terms of independence and superiority this does occur but men will just as often interpret language in terms of relationships.
Quotes  “Male and female experts and non-expert pairs. Experts talked more than non-experts, but male experts talked more than female experts.            Non-experts gave more supporting feedback (uh huh, I see) than experts, except that female experts talking to male non-experts gave more feedback.”

“Men use opposition such as teasing, harassing, bantering, wrestling to show friendship (Boy teasing girl he likes). Bragging and one-upmanship is not looked down upon.

For women this is confrontational and shows antagonism not solidarity.”

“This state of affairs means that men talk a lot and women politely listen.”

AOS 1 unit 4 journal: The great Australian speech impediment

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Title  The great Australian speech impediment
Date  4th August 2014
Author  Dean Frenkel
URL  http://www.theage.com.au/comment/the-great-australian-speech-impediment-20140801-zzjjx.html
Publication  The Age
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  Most Australians have poor speaking skills, even though literacy and numeracy has improved over the last 100 years speaking has not.
  • In the past people looked favourably on people who spoke with a rebellious speech manner and an Aussie accent so to assert their Australian identity against British imperialism.
  • It is typically Australian to be suspicious of people who speak to well.
  • The dumbed down demeanour remain socially advantageous.
Feature of Language  Pronunciation of words:

  • Flapping,
  • Reduction,
  • Shortening,
  • Addition of sounds.
Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.
  • Stylistic features in informal speech and writing, including phonological patterning, syntactic patterning, morphological patterning, and lexical choice and semantic patterning.
  • Characteristics of Australian English in contrast to Englishes from other continents, in phonological, lexical, prosodic, and/or grammatical patterns.
  • The role of language in constructing national identity.
  • The relationship between social attitudes and language choices.
My opinion on the Article’s comments.  The standard of Australia’s speaking skills has not improved over the years in comparison with the increase in numeracy and literacy skills. In schools there is a lack of emphasis placed on speaking well, with it often neglected in favour of written work. This is not a problem when Australians speak with other Australians as this style of speaking is known and is accepted in Australia. It is when other Australians speak to international English speakers that Australian English is seen lacking in speech.
Quotes  “most sober Australians pickle their speech with lazy, restricted and heavy articulation.””The unified Aussie accent is a complex soup of many accented languages – including English, German, Aboriginal, Irish, Scottish, Italian, Greek, as well as more recent regional influences.”

“The Aussie is the slow kid in the world classroom – our lazy national speech manner is unthreatening to ‘‘oversea-ers’’ who fondly perceive us as laid-back.”

AOS 1 unit 4 journal: Popular TV shows spawn ‘frankenwords’

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Title  Popular TV shows spawn ‘frankenwords’
Date  27 July 2014
Author  Annabel Crabb
URL  http://www.theage.com.au/comment/popular-tv-shows-spawn-frankenwords-20140725-zwt38.html
Publication  The Age
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  • Commentators are using new terms to allow ellipsis to occur in their sentences.
  • Creating new words by changing the word class of old words through affixation.
  • Having reality television shows means that more slang and non-standard language is being shown on television.
Feature of Language
  • Idioms
  • Shortening
  • Affixation
  • Changing word class
Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.  Word addition: compounding, commonisation, neologism. 

The use of informal language in promoting linguistic innovation.

The relationship between the context and the features of language in informal texts.

The effects of context on language choices.

My opinion on the Article’s comments.  The use of slang and informal language on Television will grow as the their is an overall descriptivist view held by the public. When TV is live their will also be a greater use of informal language used by commentators as it is more spontaneous and is less rehearsed. In reality TV where untrained average day people star on the television there will also  be greater informality as the language used is spontaneous and reflects the language used everyday by the public. That is why you will often find new words being used by commentators or on reality TV shows where the language use is usually not as tightly restricted.
Quotes  “Some years ago, someone – and I don’t know exactly who – decided that the phrase “win a medal” was too cumbersome and lengthy, and pioneered instead the concept of “medalling””

“But consultation with the Oxford English Dictionary reveals that “gifting” isn’t a horrible modern aberration at all; it’s an ancient one, first recorded in an anonymous 16th-century ballad entitled A Merry Jest Of A Shrewd And Curst Wife Lapped In Morel’s Skin For Her Good Behaviour.”

AOS 1 unit 4 journal: 12 things Australian bosses never want to hear

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Title  12 things Australian bosses never want to hear
Date  29 July 2014
Author  Sarah Kimmorley
URL  http://www.smh.com.au/executive-style/management/12-things-australian-bosses-never-want-to-hear-20140729-zxryj.html
Publication  Sydney Morning Herald
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  The use of Positive language can hugely impact a business’ success.
  • Negative outlooks towards a goal is the most disliked attitude for bosses. This attitude shows that the employee is not confident in their or the team’s abilities to succeed and is not open minded to investigate other avenues to success.
  • Bosses like confidence and initiative to be shown by their employees.
  • The use of the pronoun “you” to refer to the company is disliked and bosses would rather an inclusive pronoun such as “we” so to know the employee feels about of the company.
Feature of Language  Inclusive langauge.

Euphemisms and Dysphemism’s.

Interrogative sentence types.

Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.
  • The use of formal language in: clarifying, manipulating or obfuscating, establishing expertise
  • The effects of context on language choices
  • The relationship between the context and the features of language
My opinion on the Article’s comments.  Having confidence in your abilities at work is important it reinforces that you belong there and showing a lack of confidence where you are having to question others can show your lack of expertise. It is important though that workers feel confident and safe in their positions so that they able to ask questions when unsure so they can do the job right. Bosses gain confidence when their workers display a positive attitude to their work as such attitude shows them that the tasks they have assigned them will be done properly.
Quotes  “The truth is, you can’t know that it won’t work. Start-ups need people to be thinking “we can” or “it might work”. I would much prefer to hear “let’s test it” or “how can we make this work”.”

” In my experience the people who have said to me “I hope I do this well, I don’t want to disappoint you” have been the people that have walked away mid-project because it got too overwhelming.”

” I would rather hear, “Whilst that might be challenging, here is how I think we should do it!”. That’s a lot more positive and shows a can-do attitude, which is very much at the core of Agent99 PR’s values.”

AOS 1 unit 4 journal: Who wins in the name game?

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Title  Who wins in the name game?
Date  2nd August 2014
Author  Cody C. Delistraty
URL  http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2014/07/31/comment-who-wins-name-game
Publication  SBS
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  The ability to pronounce someone’s name is related to how close you are with them.
  • Companies with simple and easy to pronounce names have higher investments in them compared to more complex named companies even when there is little known about them.
  • People with easier to pronounce names are more likely to be hired and promoted as they are judged more positively.
  • In fields of work that are dominated by men, females with sexually ambiguous names tend to be more successful.
  • People with white sounding names were more likely to be given a job over an African American name where each candidate is otherwise equal.
Feature of Language  Language’s ability to hold identity. In this case the names of people show their identity possibly in regards to race, culture and socio-economic status etc.The pronunciation of words/names. How accents hold identity and that the pronunciation of easy names for native English speakers can be hard for non native speakers even though the spelling is very simple e.g. “Cody”.
Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.  Language can represent and display identity. People can presume and make assumptions from your use of language and even through names and written texts.
My opinion on the Article’s comments.  The name you are given does not affect the likely hood of you going to university of if you will have good grades, when these links are made it is not because of your name but because of you background and culture that you have been brought up in. When the article quotes that people in the French Baccalaureate with a name of “Marie”did better than average, it is because it is a name which is common in upper classed families and therefore would have had the backing and support to try and achieve the best education possible. In this regard names can represent identity, showing things such as your race, age and religion. On face value people can make judgements of you from your name but these judgements will quick evaporate and hold little weight once a meeting of the 2 people in question has occurred.
Quotes  “Our brains tend to believe that if something is difficult to understand, it must also be high-risk.”

“A first name can imply race, age, socioeconomic status, and sometimes religion, so it’s an easy—or lazy—way to judge someone’s background, character, and intelligence.”

“In competitive fields that have classically been dominated by men, such as law and engineering, women with sexually ambiguous names tend to be more successful.”