AOS 2 unit 4 journal: Legally Brown: Muslim comedian finds the funny in radical, be it jihadists or bogans

Click here for a link to the article.

Title  Legally Brown: Muslim comedian finds the funny in radical, be it jihadists or bogans
Date  24th September 2013
Author  Waleed Aly
URL  http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/box-seat/legally-brown-muslim-comedian-finds-the-funny-in-radical-be-it-jihadists-or-bogans-20130924-2uavt.html
Publication  Sydney Morning Herald
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  Comedian Nazeem Hussain is showing how Australian are being subconsciously racist.
  • He is also pointing fun at the extreme lengths that some take to be politically correct.
  • Showing how many Australian have a pre-determined fear of Muslims.
  • Some people are outrage that Muslims should criticise Australia’s way of life, because by putting it bluntly they are not “real Australians”.
  • How language of specific cultures are stereotyped.
Feature of Language  The use of metaphors and comparisons to show a message.Ethnolects can divide Australian society.

Use of accent to create an identity.

Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.
  • features of language that contribute to a sense of individual identity and group membership
  • National Identity of Australia and that it is changing.
My opinion on the Article’s comments.  Many Australians have been offended by Nazeem Hussain’s “Living Brown” TV show. This for many is because they feel uncomfortable when they find themselves being critiqued or being shown to be a racist by the shows skits. Many may find they have made similar assumptions to what is being highlighted in the show, this can have the viewer feel uneasy and guilty. Though this is the reason for Nazeem creating the show, to highlight to Australians how assumption they have made are wrong so that they can learn from their mistakes.
Quotes  “He’s exposing a binary world where there’s whiteness, and then otherness. Where white people are individuals and non-white people (a singular group) are not.””(Muslims) we were outsiders, and should behave as such. We were not, to borrow from Michael Smith again, “real Australians”. We should know our place. We are welcome, but only as supplicants, celebrating the nation’s unblemished virtue.”

““ethnic” comedy in Australia has hitherto been about the parading of stereotypes for comfortable, mainstream consumption.”

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