AOS 2 unit 3 journal. On Spitting and Another Think

Click here for a link to the article.

Title  On Spitting and Another Think
Date 4/09/2014
Author  Mark Allen
URL http://www.copyediting.com/spitting-and-another-think
Publication  Copy Editing, Language in the digital age
Key Ideas (Point Form)
  •  Newspapers take on a prescriptivist view when it comes to coining new phrases, by using a more traditional phrase instead of newer and more popular phrases.
  • Styles guides do not reflect the change in language.
  • “Correct forms” of language are not at popular in the community as the more modern “less correct” phrases.
Feature of Language  Style guides are using more formal language even if it does not reflect the use of language of the people.
The continual evolution of language, as it changes to suit the user’s needs and wants.
Aspects of the Course this Article Relates to.  The use of formal language in: reinforcing social distance and authority, establishing expertise.

Attitudes within society to different varieties of English, including prescriptivism and descriptivism.

My opinion on the Article’s comments.  Style guides should update their use of language when it comes to phrases. Using the phrase “you’ve got another think coming” appears strange and out of place for many people as it has been replaced by the more popularly used “you’ve got another thing coming”. It is the same with “split and image” which is now known as “splitting image”. Using phrases that are known to more readers makes sense as using language that is unknown to the reader may distance then from the article. This is why style guides should be inclined to use colloquial terms and phrases.
Quotes  “This curious phrase has a somewhat murky history, but everyone agrees that the traditional version is “spit and image.” While many usage authorities permit the widespread variant “spitting image,” our style book urges us to hold the line”

“The OED says “another thing coming” arises at about the same time from “a misapprehension” of “have another think coming,” a phrase that the OED dates to just a few years earlier.”

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